Etc passwd is world writable


Similarly, mod_auth_file will refuse to use an AuthUserFile or AuthGroupFile if that file lives in a directory, and that directory has world-writable permissions (even if the configured file itself is not world-writable). A world-writable directory would allow any system user to delete the AuthUserFile, and add their own, or to add a symlink, etc. If nano (or any other text editor) has a SUID-bit, it can be used to edit /etc/passwd to change the root password. Passwd is a text file containing user records and is located in the /etc/ directory. For example, the entry for root looks like this: Re: /etc/default/security file As of 2019, most of this has been outdated for about 10 years, as I understand. Instead of using "Trusted System" mode, the current recommendation to use /etc/shadow by using the LongPassword11i3 features (currently included in the HP-UX 11i Base Operating Environment Component Bundle). I have a computer with Ubuntu 13.10 installed. The user (say Walesa) has changed the ownership of etc folder and all its subfolders from root to Welesa using a privileged file manager. As sudo was Welcome to LinuxQuestions.org, a friendly and active Linux Community. You are currently viewing LQ as a guest. By joining our community you will have the ability to post topics, receive our newsletter, use the advanced search, subscribe to threads and access many other special features. Dec 05, 2019 · Dismiss Join GitHub today. GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. If nano (or any other text editor) has a SUID-bit, it can be used to edit /etc/passwd to change the root password. Passwd is a text file containing user records and is located in the /etc/ directory. For example, the entry for root looks like this: